BIOBLOGS: 21ST CENTURY RESUMES

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Archive for October 2007

BRAND BIOBLOG

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Branding, to those promoting their brandmeister wares, can make pixie dust out of a pig’s ear; it can transform a wheelbarrow of manure into a jasmine-scented luxury ride, a leather thong into a fur bikini. Branding adds value, they say, to the hidden essence waiting to be released, encapsulating and highlighting the veritable “uniqueness” of the goods and products, separating them from their crass, generic, archetypal forms. Not a smoke, but a Marlboro; not a purse, but a Vitton; not a burger, but a Big Mac.  But how true is this? Are not the known brands of the world the result rather than the process of “claiming” a branded image? It’s easy to “brand” something that only the rich can afford because the currency of the difference is simple enough; and the food experience is not complicated to brand.

But what about this business of “branding yourself,” and how are you supposed to do this since you are limited to just one version of you? Aren’t each and every one of us on this planet essentially a unique brand (of humankind)? I’m like Mark Hovin (JobBait.com) in that when a branded and an unbranded CFO or marketing manager of whatever are compared side-by-side, where is the difference? Is one wearing a silly hat? Is the other one wearing no pants? What do they have to distinguish themselves from one another than (1) physical appearance, (2) psychological make-up, (3) character at work (public persona) and (4) experience in the real world (results, know how, common sense, drive).

One man says “my kids play soccer” and the other says “I raise dairy goats.” Which one is branded?

One woman says “I feel hurt when we miss our goals” and the other says “my work is never done.” Which one is branded?

I’ll be honest: the only place I see where a job seeking person can incorporate any of this branding business into their personal path is by creating a distinctive and provacative bioblog–relying on a powerful image for the subliminal message–and embellishing their “work experience + education” with a good sense of their creative character.

Written by 1stbioblogger

October 28, 2007 at 9:01 pm

Posted in resumes

OPEN BOOK

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This is the 3rd example of the Pro Forma bioblog form in which the objective is to drive the main point across without delay and without superfluous distractions. It calls for the reader to accept the bioblog more as an invitation (RSVP) than a typical resume (those dreary “job obituaries” as the headhunters call them). A little artwork and interesting typography combine to make a powerful statement with a quiet and steady voice.

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Written by 1stbioblogger

October 14, 2007 at 4:48 pm

Posted in resumes

BLOCK FORM

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This is example #2 of the Pro Forma bioblog version in which almost standard resume formatted material is jazzed up with enough graphics to help sail it through the stack to the top. Remember, words are a dime a thousand and there are 70 million resumes full of similar words (English has only so many to offer writers about working), so that is why we must rely on the help of graphical interface just like other advertisers. This example shows just how little it takes of some visual help to make the whole resume work better; the background image doesn’t distract, but rather contributes an ambiance of seriousness to an already no-frills bioblog.

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Written by 1stbioblogger

October 14, 2007 at 4:46 pm

Posted in resumes

INDUSTRIAL STRENGTH

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Another “traditional form” of bioblogging is the Industrial form in which a scene from the industry occupies the background, with the foreground dedicated to the person’s workplace particulars. Needless to say, any industry has endless visual possibilities to work with–see commercial advertising in the Wall Street Journal or business magazines to view how they do it constantly–and is a good place to start from if you have 15-20+ years in one industry. People with years of changing times are, for better or worse, practically inseparable from their industry’s successes and failures, so the general background is a good place to start from.

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Written by 1stbioblogger

October 14, 2007 at 4:01 pm

Posted in resumes

PORTRAITS

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The Portrait form is a bioblog that is almost a mirror or painted image, although it may be a sketch of your creative character more than a Photoshopped jpeg. Because people are so easily attracted to the at least looking momentarily at a face, we can grab their attention to move them to our information, shown here in an easily comprehensible format that goes beyond the parameters of typical resume phrases and keywords. Her sense of self (at work) and her wrap-up of her expertise/experience is succinct and trimmed like a newly bud rose.

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Written by 1stbioblogger

October 14, 2007 at 3:56 pm

Posted in resumes

THE QUESTION FORM

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Sometimes all the work looks the same over a lengthy period of time, yet in a personal discussion one would learn how the challenges were considerably different. Rather than write it all out in tedious passages that one cannot be certain will even be read, it might work better to “connect the dots” with the focus on the main point: the player in those situations who dealt with the issues and opportunities. In other words, paint a portrait of the character, not the furniture of the workplace in the background. This bioblog is the beginning of a form (the Question Posed): from a simple question designed to momentarily engage the reader’s interest, it goes on to imply that from your education and experience in the world and at work that you have an answer; not especially “the answer” but one that the reader would enjoy discussing in a personal interview, that hallowed place where the closing is made, or not.

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Written by 1stbioblogger

October 13, 2007 at 6:07 pm

Posted in resumes